list2

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list2

Postby Chris E » Tue May 12, 2009 12:03 am

Here we go. We went though 750 photos and narrowed it down to this. Now there are MANY we cut out that are way cooler and sexier than these, but generally we cut out things that a) were in low risk neighbourhoods b) seemed low risk of being torn down due to perfect up keep, low development pressures, etc c) were realllllly nice but there's lots of the same type of building all over the city

In Cliff Bungalow, the so called 'painted ladies'. These are more potentially valuable for their paint schemes and wooden hippie decor, possibly from the 60's as Cliff Bungalow was apparently hippie central back in the day. Risk is high, due apartment height zoning, and the average to below average maintenance of the houses.

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In Cliff Bungalow, the Belzberg house. How many duplexes are there

from the 1912 era in Calgary? probably about 10, how many are brick? Probably about 2-3, how many aren't a dump? This one. Risk is high as there have already been rumours of owners wanting to demolish this.

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In Cliff Bungalow, the Gordon Suites. These are some pretty unique looking houses, unlike any I've seen anywhere else in the city, as well a 'friend of CHI' has apparently already done some research on them, and there's also some odd barn or something in the back yard. As you can see the maintenance is a bit below average which adds to risk.
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Another Beltline streetscape, this one is a bit different as instead of similar scaled 2 story housing, this is a mix of smaller bungalows and then 2 larger homes that are unlike anything else I've seen in this city, definately unique. As for Risk similar to the Bob-scape.
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Again in the Beltline, Grant bros store. This is a very well preserved example of a turn of the century store front, that amazingly hasn't been hardly mucked up at all, however the risk must be high being on 17th ave and being only 1 story, this is once again a 'can't believe it's still here' site.
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Beltline again, remember what I said about the rarity of turn of the century duplexes? Here's another one of the survivors, hard to say how much of the exterior and general shape is original , or something redesigned at a later date.
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These next two photos are downtown, on the west end, the last remaining evidence that the downtown core was once 75% single family home residential. With all the condos going up in the west end of downtown these houses are like not long for this earth (unless we help save em of course ;) Valuable simply as what could be a small 4 shop retail area, which also shows how the area was in the past
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In Sunnyside, the Lunenberg. Well about as rare as turn of the century duplexes, are turn of the century rowhousing. There's a rumour that these were actually demolished down to their foundations and then rebuilt, although I'm not sure of the economics of such an adventure. Off the top of my head I can think of only 5 examples, 3 brick, 2 wood, the 3 brick are on the inventory, the 2 wooden are not. The risk could be quite high as there is a plan to rezone this part of Sunnyside as part of the Transit Oriented Development (TOD) zone which would upzone these blocks from this to potentially 8-12 story towers.
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In Cliff Bungalow, small apartment, not the greatest shape, Zoning is higher but not overly higher. Perhaps it's not in as much risk as other sites, but it sure is cute, and since I said it's not in as much risk, that just means it will be torn down tomorrow, just watch! Any apartment built before the 50's is rare and valuable in this city.
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Cliff Bungalow, the Elliot. What's about as rare as duplexes and rowhousing and turn of the century apartments? Art Deco. Art deco buildings in this city could be counted on two hands, and this is one of them. Ain't it a beaut?
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The Marylin apartments once again in Cliff Bungalow. Again rather Art Decoish, and also the home of Kristi, who will be supervising you, but don't let that cloud your judgement, she's easy to bribe with free drinks.
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The Laurence, also in Cliff Bungalow. In the 30's most of what was then the inner city was upzoned for apts as people couldnt' afford to buy houses in the depression. Most people simply took big old houses and divided them into suites, most apartments that took advantage of the new zoning weren't built until the 50's, so they ended up being rather boring, but as you can see Cliff Bungalow (and Mission as you'll see) are an exception, a number of apartments were built in and around the 20s/30s/40s. Almost nothing was built in calgary in that era, especially apartments.
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Here's a big square house in Cliff Bungalow. I only included it as I thought I heard a rumour that it may have been a school, it doesn't look like any sort of normal house shape, so it's worth looking into.
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Here's another big house, unlike any other in Cliff Bungalow, and sits on likely the largest house lot in the area, so it may have some interesting history, as well the area where it sits is zoned for apartments, so it's at risk.
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Avonlea apartments in Mission (adjacent to Cliff Bungalow). If you thought sites in Cliff Bungalow were at risk, they have nothing on Mission where the entire community has been zoned for highrises, so everything here is at grave risk. And it's cute.
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We have love for houses with "turret appeal" and boy does this one fit the bill. And it has a name! And the name includes Castle. Easily the coolest house in Mission. How at risk is it? Well in theory very high since 15-20 story apartments can be built in it's place, that said it's usually owned (leased?) by businesses, who tend to maintain sites better than slumlords.
Another big concern is that I'd possibly like to buy it when I'm rich, and that goal is helped by it still standing.
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Again in Mission, Gloria Court. Pretty much anything even resembling an Art Deco apartment is extremely valuable and a rarity in this city. And again, in Mission, where a few years ago the residents complained that every single block in mission had construction on it (ie demolitions). Nuff said.
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Another Mission apartment. Soon to be bulldozer fodder unless we save it. By we, I mean you.
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Remember when I mentioned only 2 *wooden* rowhousing I could think of? here's the other one in Lower Mount Royal. All of LMR is zoned for apartments, so it could be in danger. Included is 1924 and 2005 aerial photos, to prove we're not making this up.
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A big house in LMR, rooming house that is. Not sure of the risk, but larger apartment like structures from the era tend to be more unique than the housing surrounding them, and with so many more people having lived there, perhaps easier to research.
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Here's an interesting house. Back in the day Sunalta south of 12th ave, and east of 17th street were single family housing, but the north west corner of the neighbourhood was pretty much open plains, other than a few scattered houses. This is one of them, as you can see by the first glenbow photo there was nothing around it back then. Later you can see it was used as an alcohol treatment centre. Today it's apartments (biggg extension off the back), not sure if there's any sort of centre there now, but it definately has had 3 eras in it's life. The area is now all zoned for apartments.
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when it was an alcoholic centre in the 70s
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What can I say about the Condon building. It's not like anything shown so far, but technically anything 45 yrs old can be added to the heritage inventory, and 45 yrs old is 1962 so we have to start looking at 50's and 60's buildings. This one is unlike anything else in the city, and with that blue wavy roof and dark blue tiles.. well what can you say. Potentially at high risk as there's rumours of someone wanting to tear it down. If it helps any, the only other building I can think of with tile on it is the Elveden building downtown, and city hall itself made sure it got on the inventory. It took me a year to go from hating to loving this building, don't worry, it will happen to you too. Oh yeah, in the community of Sunalta.
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Sunnyside grocery, in the community of.. well I guess it's obvious. Not many wooden turn of the century corner stores in existance anymore, especially with a roof kinda like a castle. I'm not sure if it's more in danger of being torn down, or just kinda.. falling down. But it sure is unique, and in a bit you'll see another threatened building in Sunnyside of a similar style. This building site is NOT part of the Sunnyside TOD, so at least not threatened by that.
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The 2 brick commercial buildings to the north of these 3 shops are on the heritage inventory, but these smaller ones were missed. Turn of the century storefronts of only a single story are actually more rare than the 2 story variety, and this is part of the Sunnyside TOD so could end up quite at risk.
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Lido Cafe, again part of the Sunnyside TOD, and also right next to a development that will tear down some buildings, that is rumoured to be expanding to include this building, so the risk is very high for this. I believe the cafe business itself has been around for decades and decades, so it may be as much historic value as the building.
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This is the 4 plex I mentioned that is of the same style as the sunnyside store. This is VERY threatened as that development that might affect the Lido Cafe is definately going to affect this, in fact the City apparently has bought this property to turn it into a parking lot, does that make you mad? good.
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Now this. Doesn't look like much, but if you look at it it almost certainly wasn't a house when it was first built, but a tiny store of some sort (imagine the front isn't flat, but instead had glass windows that then jut inwards to a door in the middle). Also this was apparently built in 1905, which would mean it was built when *nothing else existed in tuxedo* or really anywhere north of 16th ave or even in crescent heights, so I'm personally very curious what's up with this middle of nowhere store. That said it's been mucked up beyond recognition. It's also been for sale a few times in the past couple years, which increases the risk
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Family Groceteria in Tuxedo. Kristi likes it... I um... it sure is retro hey?
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These next 3 sites are apartments in Victoria Park. As I said all apartments are rare from the 19-teens through the 40s. And of course Vic park and the rest of the Beltline are undergoing huge redevelopment pressures.
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This is Soda. Now just because we have more pics of this don't consider it more loved by us, everything is equally loved on this page (cept maybe the groceteria (cough cough)). It's the one commercial building near 1st ave SW that we don't really know much about. As you can see I got my self inside for some secret pics.
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Chris E
 
Posts: 221
Joined: Fri Oct 07, 2005 12:13 pm
Location: Calgary

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